WIP Wednesday – My Boat Socks

There’s been a ball of Noro Silk Garden burning a hole in my stash for a number of months now.  Add to that the Edwardian Boat Socks pattern that I bookmarked years ago before I knew how to knit socks, before I learned to use double pointed needles, before I had ever knitted anything in the round.  Mix it all up and you have my WIP for this week!

The whole thing started last Friday as a bit of an accident.  I knew my next project would be socks, but I thought I’d stick to a simple ribbed pattern.  After looking through my Ravelry favourites however, I found this little gem that I’d stashed away after reading about it in the Yarn Harlot blog.  I’ve tried finding the actual post but haven’t had much luck (after trying for about 3 seconds).  All I can say is I saw these socks and wondered if I would ever be good enough to knit something this fabulous.

Jump forward 2 years and after reading through the pattern now I was pretty confident.  I’m up to the point of turning the heel things are going really well as far as following the pattern.  I have made a lot of mistakes but I’m not to worried about them.

The reason I’m not too worried about them is because the biggest problem with this project is the choice of yarn.  But before we go too much into why this is the wrong yarn for the project, let’s look at the photos.

Here’s where I’m up to.  Photos taken on my train trip this morning to try to get some natural light!

IMG-20130821-00044

Here’s a close up, apologies my phone doesn’t take the best photos.IMG-20130821-00047Now let’s talk about why I will never use Noro Silk Garden for this (or perhaps any other) pattern again.  The yarn itself is single ply. There is no consistency in the width, it goes thinner and thicker, thinner and thicker.  This means the beautiful stitch in this pattern is not properly visible.  At one point the yarn even split on me as I was knitting, which I’m sure everyone agrees is such a wonderful thing to happen when you’re half way through a row!!

The colours in this yarn are absolutely beautiful, there’s no doubt about it.  But I have to say after my first experience knitting with Noro, I’m really starting to wonder what all of the fuss is about. There are lots of great quality yarns out there in magnificent colours.

Can anyone out there explain to me why Noro is supposed to be so highly regarded?  Or is it just that I’ve been listening to too much marketing material 🙂

Check out other WIPs at Tami’s blog!

14 thoughts on “WIP Wednesday – My Boat Socks

  1. Thanks for sharing your experience and thoughts on Noro, I have never used it myself, (it does look stunning in your project by the way) but I will keep your comments in consideration should I ever come across it 🙂
    x
    Natalie
    Marigolds’ Loft

  2. I think people love Noro for the extraordinary colors. I agree with you that it can be real nuisance to knit. Talk about rustic. I have used it a few times for crochet projects and am happier with them; also Kureyon felts nicely. I crocheted a shawlette recently with Noro Silk Garden sock and was happy with the appearance, but it is a bit scratchy. You are so right that there are plenty of other color change yarns out there.

    The Japanese have a concept of “wabi-sabi” which is an aesthetic that embraces imperfection; Noro fits right in 🙂

    • Rustic is exactly the word I was thinking of. And I do agree that imperfections are sometimes what makes things perfect. Perhaps I won’t write off all Noro yarn just yet!

  3. Your socks are amazing. I have never used noro and I am not sure I ever will. I recently went searching for long color changing yarn for a project and I was not impressed by the softness, or quality of the noro I saw in my LYSs. The colors are extraordinary but it seems pricy for scratchy, uneven yarn.

  4. Pingback: Finished Objects Friday – Does One Sock Count? | alikelylass

  5. Pingback: Finished Objects Friday – Owlie Socks for Ang | alikelylass

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